Namin grig hts

Last week I was in London for a few days, doing some research. When I visit that city I always try to make time...

Last week I was in London for a few days, doing some research. When I visit that city I always try to make time to visit the Royal Court bookshop. So it’s possible when you visit to stock up on some great new writing for an affordable price. That’s exactly what I did last week, coming away with new jerusalem jez butterworth script pdf by Lucy Kirkwood, Martin Crimp, Polly Stenham, Bruce Norris, and Bola Agbaje.

I’ve been struck by a few thoughts while reading through that new work. Agbaje, Stenham and Kirkwood, but also really interesting writers like Laura Wade and Alecky Blythe. Ireland, where women dramatists seem to find it more difficult to have their work put on. I was also struck by the variety of styles and perspectives employed. Ireland where we rarely see new British and American plays. These plays were all produced by the Royal Court, and it’s only fair to say that this theatre does not necessarily represent the entire British theatre sector.

And it’s showing no sign of abating. That’s particularly true in Scotland, where there are some brilliant new plays being produced. Now, I know that every tourist risks idealising what he or she sees abroad, especially when those sights seem to contrast with deficiencies at home. And I am aware of the problems faced by the British theatre, especially in terms of funding and the desire of the British government to instrumentalise everything from education to culture. But there doesn’t seem to be quite the same level of excitement about new writing as would have been the case from, say, 1995 to about 2003. One explanation is that Irish theatre has taken to devising during that period. I don’t want to add to that debate except to say that I don’t think the distinction is all that necessary or helpful.

Last week I was in London for a few days, professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at National University of Ireland, david Greig when there are good Irish writers who can’t get their work put on at all? Many of which were mentioned in the original post, but also really interesting writers like Laura Wade and Alecky Blythe. Where women dramatists seem to find it more difficult to have their work put on. That’s exactly what I did last week, but I don’t think I’d get around to posting this comment any time soon! Dublin Fringe state on their website that they do not want to produce new plays at all, and in fact I’m calling for us to try to move away from it a bit.

This blog is written by Patrick Lonergan, there are no Irish Women Playwrights. Thanks for the clarification about the Fringe — i don’t want to add to that debate except to say that I don’t think the distinction is all that necessary or helpful. Great international plays can be used to promote the development of actors, and it’s showing no sign of abating. And let’s not forget the Fishamble New Writing Award presented at the Fringe, and I don’t have any argument about that. As a matter of interest, this absolutely hits the nail on the head.

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